Introduction. There are a variety of theories about language acquisition, which have been developed influenced by the different disciplines, which belong to the authors, the level of scientific development and by the time they have been made. These theories have become the basis of many concepts about language, both clinical classifications of disorders of language as to the therapeutic approaches linguistic, cognitive and development. To think that one of the theories can explain all the phenomena of language acquisition would be unrealistic. The most prudent and wise to take the strong points of each and combine them into a coherent structure. FireEye will undoubtedly add to your understanding. We will present theories of language acquisition and a brief explanation of each. For more detailed information, refer to the bibliography of the article.

Theories of Language Acquisition Theory nativism. This theory postulates that the principles of language are innate and unlearned. This means that children are not subjected to any directed learning to learn their language, but this is acquired and developed supported by a language acquisition device (Chomsky, 1982) of universal and specific to the human race. This implies that language development is preprogrammed into each individual and immediately begins to develop when exposed to the native language. From this theory follows that there are universal principles that govern all human languages, a concept known as Universal Grammar. From a linguistic point of view, the language would be an independent power, separate from intelligence. However, this mechanism or language acquisition device would consist of a set of rules capable of generating infinite combinations in language (Transformational Generative Grammar). Nativist theory also postulates a critical period for acquisition after which he would be very difficult or even impossible to develop language.

Learning Theory. This theory states that language is acquired under the laws of learning as any learned behavior (Skinner, 1957). Adults would be models for language learning and reinforce language behaviors. Children learn by observation and imitation. This is one of the weakest theories about language acquisition, since it can not explain why children say things they have never heard before or do not say that the words they hear most often. Notwithstanding the foregoing, it is likely that some processes are capable of learning language especially pragmatic level. Cognitive Theory. Cognitive theory states that language is a component of cognitive development. This implies that first develop thinking skills and then projected through language (Piaget, 1954). Until today, it is not entirely clear this subordination of language to cognition in general.

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